Natural Stone - Tile and Stone by Villagio

Going All Natural: Pro’s and Con’s of Natural Stone

Natural stone tiles are distinct and unique. 
You should always view several pieces of the tile that is to be installed before the installation begins. Since it has been created by nature, not only are no two pieces exactly alike, those two pieces may not even be very similar.

The most common natural stone tiles include:
Slate, flagstone (sandstone), marble, granite, travertine and limestone. Each stone has unique characteristics and maintenance requirements.

Generally, you should seal natural stone tile before grouting,
unless you are planning on using the grout color in the stone as a design element.

Most natural stones are not resistant against common household acids (like lemon juice) or oil stains.
Therefore, you should use a penetrating sealer for all natural stones after installation. Follow manufacturers instructions on frequency of re-application.

The advantages of natural stone

– Timeless, unique appearance
– Design capabilities of through-body color material
– Perceived value
– Durable countertops and floors (granite)
– May be re-polished if scratched

The disadvantages of natural stone

– Ongoing re-sealing program is required
– Limited chemical and stain resistance
– Higher installation costs than ceramic tile
– Product received seldom looks like the sample

Selecting Tile - Tile and Stone by Villagio

Tips on Selecting Tile

Consider the interior environment that you will create

  • Color will make the room look larger or smaller.
  • Size will determine the number of grout joints. Large-unit tiles work equally well in large or small rooms. Smaller tiles are usually intended for smaller rooms or to create a pattern.
  • Direction will create either a visual flow or a distinctive area

To make a room appear – Use

Larger – Light-medium colors or large format tiles

Smaller
– Medium-dark colors or small format tiles

Lighter – Light-medium colors

Darker – Medium-dark colors (dark colors work best in rooms with plenty of natural light)

Warmer – “Warm” colors
Cooler – “Cool” colors

Neutral color – Larger tiles with coordinating grout joints or stone tile with thin coordinating grout joints

Color accents
– Inset color using field tile or decos

Larger with a visual flow – Using the same tile from room to room

Distinctive rooms and areas
– Change the size, the direction or use decos

All About Grout

All About Grout

What is grout?

Most grouts are cement-based fillers used to fill the joints between tiles. Typical width is 3/16″ – 1/4″ on floor tiles, and/or more on rustic tiles and clay pavers. Grout joints under 1/8″ require a non-sanded grout; larger joints require a sanded grout. Adding latex or polymers to a cementitious grout will increase its strength. Other types of grout include epoxy, furan and “Teflon” grout.

Grout characteristics

Grout is subject to shade variation and should not be expected to be uniform in color. Causes of shading include; the amount of water used in mixing & clean up, environmental effects such as sun, shade and humidity, and mortar depth.

Grout is durable. Most grouts are cement-based products; they are very hard & dense. Grout will withstand use (and yes, some abuse) for the life of your tile installation.

Grout is porous. The grout on your floor will not continue to look as bright and colorful as it will initially. Over time, the dirt that gets onto your floor will tone down the color of your grout.

Grout cures in 28 days. If you’re mop daily with clean water (NO CLEANER) the first week it will strengthen the grout.

Properly installed grout will provide years of worry-free use.

Grout as a design element

Choose your grout color carefully. The grout color will affect the overall appearance.

Choose a coordinating or slightly contrasting grout. A coordination grout color will create a more uniform look, while a sharp-contrasting grout will draw attention to the joint itself. Avoid very dark grouts with light tiles.

Neutrals and gray tones still look good over time. “Natural tones” are, well, closer to “natural dirt”, and they just look better as nature takes its course.

Grout “colorants” or “stains” are practical solutions to make grout more uniform in appearance.

Call a professional finisher for best results

Five Tips on Tile

Five Tips for Designing with Tile

1. Design with color

  • Color can change the mood of a room, highlight its good points and obscure its bad points
  • Counters and walls can use tiles that complement or contrast in color to those used on the floor
  • Tile can be cut into one-quarter size and alternate colors to create custom borders

2. Design with direction

  • Tile can be set with a straight joint, brick joint, or patterns such as herringbone, basket weave, etc
  • Change direction from straight set, to a 458 angle in another room to define different areas of the home
  • Use modular sizes of tile, to create patterns
  • Change sizes to delineate specific areas

3. Design with size

  • Use modular tiles in two or more sizes to create multiple piece patterns.
  • Change sizes within an installation to create unique effects or to delineate specific areas or rooms

4. Design with decorative factory pieces

  • Tile can be installed in an “area rug” configuration
  • Medallions can be tied in with the home’s architecture
  • Use listellos to border or personalize any room
  • Custom fabricate tiles using water jet technology

5. Design with relief and texture

  • Use various textures together for unique effects
  • Tile provides the ability to inset different tiles or stones